More Crap from CRUX

Inés San Martín, the lead Vatican reporter of CRUX - and its number two person - wrote “Pope meets victims, uses strong street term for abuse and cover-up.” Pope Francis used “caca” to describe the Church’s policy of covering up child abuse. Caca as a strong street term? In English, it is equivalent to poop, an innocuous term used with little children when “decency” forbids the usual term. Is Spanish so different than English?

A quick search for “Spanish caca” provides a clear answer. The Urban Dictionary says, “a term meaning fecal matter used by hispanics to deter their kids from touching something.” As in English, it is an innocuous term used with little children.

I double checked with WordReference.com which had responses from a forum:

  •    “I´m Spanish and I don´t think "caca" is a vulgar word, it is usually used by children.”
  •    “"caca"... Not vulgar at all!! It is commonly used when kids are around. We use caca to teach babies that something is dirty...like "caca", so they should not touch it.”
  •     “"caca" is a kids way of saying "mierda". I think it is the same way in English. Kids do not say "shit", they say "poo" (correct me if I am wrong.)”
  •   “I'm from Mexico, and as a lot of you guys, I agree that "caca" is not an offensive word meaning excrement.”
  •   “Caca and popo is said usually to small children just as poo-poo and caca is used in English. It's just as vulgar as you consider the English words.”
  •   “A friend of mine is a kindergarden teacher and a few years ago told me that "caca" is the one word most kids share regardless of their culture. She's had philippino, southern asian, african american, mexican, native american, korean, samoan, indonesian as well as american students and the one word they all knew by name and meaning, from their parents, was "caca". It was their common denominator!”

Conclusion

Once again, CRUX is full of shit. This isn’t a linguistic issue. Ms. San Martin just can’t deal with reality. This is a mix of propaganda and incompetence, as is all too often the case with religious journalism.

 

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